Studies and information

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Fire history – coming soon

Jurisdictional – coming soon

  • Roberts et al. 2017 – California Spotted Owl Occupancy On Mixed-Ownership Lands In the Sierra Nevada of California, 2012 Through 2016 – View
  • North et al. 2017 – Cover of tall trees best predicts California spotted owl habitat – View
  • Stephens et al. 2014 – California Spotted Owl, Songbird, and Small Mammal Responses to Landscape Fuel Treatments – View
  • Stephens et al. 2016 – Wildfire impacts on California spotted owl nesting habitat in the Sierra Nevada – View
  • Harris and Taylor 2017 – Previous burns and topography limit and reinforce fire severity in a large wildfire – View
  • (NEW) Fricker et al. 2019 – More than climate? Predictors of tree canopy height vary with scale in complex terrain, Sierra Nevada CA – View
  • (NEW) Jeronimo et al. 2019 – Forest structure and pattern vary by climate and landform across active-fire landscapes in the montane Sierra Nevada – View
  • (NEW) Koontz et al. 2020 – Local forest structure variability increases resilience to wildfire in dry western U.S. coniferous forests – View
  • Safford and Stephens 2017 – GTR 256: Natural range of variation in yellow pine and mixed-conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada, Southern Cascades, and Modoc and Inyo National Forests, CA – View

Also refer to Red Fir section below. 

  • North et al. 2009 – GTR 220 – An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests – View
  • North et al. 2012 – GTR 237 – Managing Sierra Nevada Forests – View
  • GTR 220 Research Brief for Resource Managers – View
  • California Fire Science Consortium: Malcolm North presentation – View
  • Frames: Malcolm North webinar – View
  • Swanston et al. 2016. GTR NRS-07 2. Forest Adaptation Resources: Climate Change Tools and Approaches for Land Managers, 2nd edition – View
  • CA Fire Science Consortium, 2012 and 2015 – Research Briefs for Resource Managers – View
  • Dow et al. 2015 – Incorporating Resource Protection Constraints in an Analysis of Landscape Fuel-Treatment Effectiveness in the Northern Sierra Nevada – View
  • Harris and Taylor 2017 – Previous burns and topography limit and reinforce fire severity in a large wildfire – View
  • (NEW) Kane et al. 2019 – First-entry wildfires can create opening and tree clump patterns characteristic of resilient forests – View
  • (NEW) Koontz et al. 2020 – Local forest structure variability increases resilience to wildfire in dry western U.S. coniferous forests – View
  • Lydersen et al. 2017 – Evidence of fuels management and fire weather influencing fire severity in an extreme fire event – View
  • North et al. 2015 – Constraints on mechanized treatment significantly limit mechanical fuels reduction extent in the Sierra Nevada – View
  • North et al. 2012 – Using fire to increase the scale, benefits, and future maintenance of fuels treatments – View
  • S. Government Accountability Office, 2017 – Report to Congress on Wildland Fire Risk Reduction – View
  • O’Hara and Ramage 2013 – Silviculture in an uncertain world: utilizing multi-aged management systems to integrate disturbance – View
  • (NEW) North et al. 2019 – Tamm Review: Reforestation for resilience in dry western US forests – View
  • Red Fir Distribution Map – View
  • Sierra National Forest Plan Excerpt on Red Fir, draft 2016 – View
  • Forest Service 2015 Red Fir Workshop Materials – View
    • Meyer, M. 2015. Red Fir NRV Presentation
    • Meyer, M. 2015. Red Fir Restoration Presentation
    • Mortenson. 2015. Red Fir Workshop
    • Rojas Sierra National Forest Red Fir RX1
    • Safford. 2015. Climate Change Variation
    • Tompkins – Plumas Red Fir Management Examples
    • Vane Hemlock Restoration Project
    • Young, K. Red Fir Workshop
    • Young, MY. Foster Firs
  • Mortenson et al. A forest health inventory assessment of red fir in upper montane California – View
  • USFS Forest Health Protection Group (Sept 2019) – Forest health concerns for Red Fir discussion document – View
  • Meyer, Marc D.; North, Malcolm P. 2019. Natural range of variation of red fir and subalpine forests in the Sierra Nevada bioregion. PSW-GTR-263 – View
  • Marc Meyer, Becky Estes, Amarina Wuenschel, Beverly Bulaon, Alexandra Stucy, Douglas Smith, and Anthony Caprio. 2019. Structure, diversity and health of Sierra Nevada red fir forests with reestablished fire regimes – View Research Brief | View Full Article
  • (NEW) Forest Service Region 5, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection, South Sierra Shared Service Area. 2020. Common Damage Agents of True Firs: Background, Biology, and Management – View White Paper

Ecological Restoration Institute, Northern Arizona University, Paper 39, Restoration as a mechanism to manage southwestern dwarf mistletoe in Ponderosa Pine forests, 8/2018 – View

4-FRI stakeholder group position letter on dwarf mistletoe, 4/2017 – View